Thoughts on Information Finding

Reflections and reblogs

Tag Archives: libraries

Guest Post: Why am I getting my MLIS? Because I have to.

Susan:

The library is changing. It has to change to remain relevant. The MLS degree needs to change along with it.

Originally posted on Agnostic, Maybe:

When I tell people I’m in graduate school studying to be a librarian, I receive the response, “You need a Master’s degree for that?” I find myself struggling to defend it. Librarians do more than what the average person realizes, but how much of that is really gained through the MLS? I usually wind up confessing it is like a stamp to gain entry a nightclub. I’ve been advised countless times by librarians that your coursework doesn’t really matter, but your experience does. I agree that there is no teacher greater than experience, but isn’t this a huge flaw in our profession’s degree? This is also disheartening for me because the first word I’ve used to describe myself most of my life is “student.” I like being in the classroom. I want to learn. I want more degree to mean more than a stamp or a merit badge.

I agree…

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Building low-cost legal digital collections on the cheap

Susan:

Doreva Belfiore gives an overview of digitization and creating digital collections using open source software.

Originally posted on Doreva Belfiore:

 

Today, while surfing the web, I found this YouTube video of Eric Gilson and John Joergensen of Rutgers Camden Law Library presenting at the 2005 CALI (Computer Aided Law Instruction) conference. In it, Gilson & Joergensen discuss how to digitize congressional documents and build a digital library in a low-cost manner using open-source software. Unfortunately, you cannot really see the screen output from the projector, but the concepts are still relevant.

For more specifics about full-text indexing, here is Joergensen at CALI 2010 explaining the Swish-e search engine which Rutgers uses to index the congressional documents:

 

Some of the processing details have changed since 2005, but the Digital Library is still running today, with over 13K congressional documents processed in its U.S. Congressional Documents collection.

If you are interested in legal informatics, I highly recommend CALI’s YouTube channel.

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